Grants

Please note that the Garfield Foundation does not accept unsolicited proposals.

2020


Collaborative Networks Program 

2020

RE-AMP Network

2020

  • RE-AMP Covid19 Emergency Response Fund – $100,000
    www.reamp.org
    Support for the RE-AMP emergency response fund responding to the Covid19 pandemic.
  • RE-AMP Network (fiscal sponsor The Minneapolis Foundation) (Minneapolis, MN)$425,000
    www.reamp.org
    An eight state (Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin) collaborative network advancing equitable deep decarbonization solutions to mitigate climate change.  Supports general operations and re-granting programs.

Cancer Free Economy Network

2020

  • CFEN Covid19 Emergency Response Fund – $100,000
    www.cancerfreeeconomy.org
    Support for the CFEN emergency response fund responding to the Covid19 pandemic.
  • Clean Production Action (Somerville, MA) – $442,692
    www.cleanproduction.org & www.cancerfreeeconomy.org
    Clean Production Action acts as the fiscal sponsor for some key elements of the Cancer Free Economy Network.  This grant supports core staffing positions and network infrastructure, enabling the Network to continue its trajectory towards greater levels of coordination, collaboration, and impact and to make collective progress toward CFEN’s guiding star goal to accelerate progress “within a generation to lift the burden of cancer and other diseases by driving a dramatic and equitable transition from toxic substances in our lives, our communities, and our economy to safe and healthy alternatives for all.”
  • Clean Production Action, (Somerville, MA) – $110,000
    www.cleanproduction.org
    Supports CFEN’s Market Shift Node to: continue to provide CFEN with relevant guidance on technical resources and collaborative campaign strategies to shift markets towards less toxic, non-carcinogenic substances in materials; continue leading on getting PFAS (polyfluroalkyl substances) out of production with increased focus on food service ware and packaging; and develop and pilot market-based and policy tools to transition to a cancer-free economy.
  • Children’s Environmental Health Network (Washington, D.C.) – $42,436
    www.cehn.org
    Supports the CFEN Health Science (HS) Node to maintain the effective implementation of its activities, and to coordinate and to maintain information flow among all of CFEN’s teams (Nodes, Hubs, Working Groups, etc).
  • Children’s Environmental Health Network (Washington, D.C.) – $110,000
    www.cehn.org
    Supports the Health and Science Node of the Cancer Free Economy Network (CFEN) with its emphasis on: compiling and translating scientific information for the Network; strengthening cancer-focused organizations as prevention advocates; advancing a prevention-focused cancer research agenda; and shifting dominant narratives around cancer prevention and environmental contributors to cancer.
  • The Labor Institute (New York, NY) – $42,436
    www.thelaborinstitute.org
    Supports the CFEN Building Power (BP) Node to maintain the effective implementation of its activities, and to coordinate and to maintain information flow among all of CFEN’s teams (Nodes, Hubs, Working Groups, etc).
  • The Labor Institute (New York, NY) – $110,000
    www.thelaborinstitute.org
    Supports CFEN’s Building Power Node to: advance grassroots education in labor and place-based constituencies cocncerning toxic exposures and the probable carcinogenic effects; strengthen the capacity of affected constituencies and communities to advocate for policies that will protect them and eliminate toxic exposures; support two place-based education and advocacy initiatives (in New York and Michigan); and improve the BP Node’s capacity for recruiting grassroots organizations to CFEN.
  • Center for Environmental Health (Oakland, CA) – $42,436
    www.ceh.org
    Supports the CFEN Policy Legal (PL) Hub to maintain the effective implementation of its activities, and to coordinate and to maintain information flow among all of CFEN’s teams (Nodes, Hubs, Working Groups, etc.).
  • Center for Environmental Health (Oakland, CA) – $100,000
    www.ceh.org
    Supports the CFEN Policy and Legal Hub to carry out strategic technical assistance to support CFEN Working Groups and Nodes. The Hub, comprising lawyers, policy specialists and environmental health and justice advocates, will also generate policy and/or legal initiatives that directly serve the Network in reaching its goal of protecting people from harmful chemicals.

Network Support

2020

  • Common Future (Oakland, CA) – $75,000
    www.commonfuture.co 
    Supports Common Future to strengthen their internal capacity to build their knowledge, skills and strategies around systems thinking, network mapping and network collaboration to significantly grow, connect and activate its members, allies, community leaders and other key stakeholders.
  • Food Solutions New England (a project of University of New Hampshire Foundation) (Durham, NH) – $50,000 
    www.foodsolutionsne.org 
    Increase environmental sustainability of the food system across New England — reducing pollution, toxics and climate change emissions in agriculture — through network growth and strengthening; narrative and communications; equity leadership; and regional policy coordination.
  • Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance (a project of Urban Sustainability Directors Network) (Port Washington, WI) – $50,000
    www.carbonneutralcities.org 
    Support training for senior city sustainability leaders to deepen stakeholder collaboration, and share what works to dramatically reduce environmental impacts in more cities throughout the world.
  • Midwest Environmental Justice Network (MWEJN), fiscal sponsor Minneapolis Foundation (Minneapolis, MN) – $60,000
    www.mwejn.org
    Supports MWEJN to develop its network structure and to build collaborative capacity. The MWEJN works to ensure that environmental justice groups in the Midwest have the resources and capacity to effectively organize and to participate in local, state, regional and federal policy development.
  • The Wallace Center at Winrock International (Little Rock, AR) – $75,000
    www.wallacecenter.org
    Supports the Food Systems Leadership Network (FSLN) to embed racial equity and anti-racism as a core component of its framework for food systems change and to build the capacity of network members to center racial equity and anti-racism in their work.
  • Energy Action Network (Montpelier, VT) – $65,000
    www.eanvt.org
    This grant follows up on work of the last two years in support of EAN’s efforts to update its systems analysis and strategy. This third year supports the establishment of “Action Teams” that will allow EAN members pursue strategic initiatives for achieving state-wide total energy goals and significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 in ways that create a more just, thriving, and sustainable future for Vermonters.

Advancing Systems Change Practices

2020

  • Blue Marble Evaluation Network (fiscal sponsor Capital Institute) – $50,000
    www.bluemarbleeval.org
    To advance training and communication about the Blue Marble Evaluation framework, a new method of gathering evidence across complex collaborative projects, to demonstrate the greater value and impacts of using systems thinking and collaborative networks.
  • Turtle Island Institute (a project of Tides Canada Initiatives Society) – $50,000
    www.tidescanada.org/project/turtle-island-institute.org
    To support a convening of systems change leaders who are black, indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) to explore the values and beliefs behind systems change practices, with a purpose of centering equity and supporting systems-change leaders to work across cultural differences and divides.  
  • The Funders Network (Coral Gables, FL) – $50,000
    www.fundersnetwork.org
    Develop training for smart growth and livable communities funders who want to be more collaborative and systemic around interconnected environmental issues such as water, climate, food, energy, and green cities.
  • The Carold Institute (Vancouver, Canada) – $40,000
    www.ckx.org
    Support coordination, collection and access to training resources among the many organizations and practitioners that guide systems change in environmental sustainability and health issues. 
  • Emergent Strategy Ideation Institute (a project of Allied Media) (Detroit, MI) – $50,000
    www.alliedmedia.org/esii
    Support training and coaching of community leaders working in the most environmentally impacted communities, to organize people connecting the environment with health and well-being in their communities.
  • Institute for Strategic Clarity (Belchertown, MA) – $30,000
    www.instituteforstrategicclarity.org
    Produce handbooks for environmental sustainability leaders to help them understand complex problems and find the best strategies for addressing environmental challenges by working better together.
  • Forum for the Future (Brooklyn, NY) – $100,000
    www.forumforthefuture.org
    Supports the next phase of the School of System Change’s growth and development: updating the Systems Basecamp curriculum and resource guides, prioritizing marketing and outreach efforts to ensure a diverse pool of applicants for US learning offers, and building a robust pool of Basecamp facilitators to support on-going programming.
  • Emergence Collective, fiscal sponsor Inquiring Systems Inc (Santa Rosa, CA) – $60,000
    www.emergence-collective.net
    Supports next steps to co-design and facilitate a group of systems capacity builders to provide peer support and capacity to those who provide training, coaching and facilitation support to emerging systems change leaders.
  • The Carold Institute (Vancouver, Canada) – $60,000
    www.ckx.org 
    The Carold Institute acts as the fiscal sponsor of the Illuminate Network: Cultivating the Field and Practice of Systems Change.  Organized as a Collaborative Network, Illuminate members will work together to facilitate new communities of practice, webinars, workgroups and collect learning resources to reach change leaders in the environmental and other social change fields.

Environmental Sustainability Program

2020

Los Angeles Sustainability

2020

  • TreePeople (Beverly Hills, CA) – $50,000
    www.treepeople.org
    General support for increasing effectiveness across programs –water, equity, urban greening, fire, education, policy and research — to help make LA’s environment more sustainable, resilient and healthy for all Angelenos.
  • Nature for All (San Gabriel, CA) $50,000
    www.lanatureforall.org
    Supports the water education element of Nature For All’s Leadership Development Program, which is focused on underserved communities to increase understanding of the complex local water infrastructure system, to determine solutions, and to advocate for the needs of their communities.
  • Pacoima Beautiful (Pacoima, CA) – $30,000
    www.pacoimabeautiful.org
    Supports Pacoima Beautiful’s Youth United Toward Environmental Protection (YUTEP), which prepares young people to become environmental and social justice advocates in their community.
  • Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy (Los Angeles, CA) – $50,000
    www.laane.org
    Supports LAANE’s efforts to ensure that quality, permanent jobs, and job training opportunities are created as part of the Measure W stormwater project development, particularly for Angelenos from underserved communities.
  • LA Waterkeeper (Santa Monica, CA) $40,000
    www.lawaterkeeper.org
    Supports the Los Angeles Waterkeeper’s efforts to address urban and stormwater runoff, the single largest source of pollution to the region’s inland and coastal waterways.
  • Heal the Bay (Santa Monica, CA) $40,000
    www.healthebay.org
    Supports Heal the Bay’s Clean Water Initiatives, which aim to monitor and protect Los Angeles’ and rivers and advance sustainable stormwater management.
  • Strategic Concepts in Organizing and Policy Education (Los Angeles, CA) – $40,000
    www.scopela.org
    Supports SCOPE to shape water resilience solutions in the Los Angeles region that are community-driven and embed a climate justice agenda.

Mercury Source Reduction

2020

  • Consumers for Dental Choice (Washington, D.C.) – $38,000
    www.toxicteeth.org 
    Supports CDC’s Campaign for Mercury-Free Dentistry, the World Alliance for Mercury Free Dentistry, and WAMFD’s effort to advise countries as they implement the reduction of dental mercury as dictated in the international treaty to control mercury pollution, the Minamata Convention.
  • Mercury Policy Project (Montpelier, VT) – $60,000
    www.mercurypolicy.org
    Supports MPP’s Zero Mercury Campaign, its engagement in the Zero Mercury Working Group, and its on-going efforts to advise on and strengthen the implementation of the Minamata Convention, the international treaty to control mercury pollution.
  • Natural Resources Defense Council (Washington, D.C.) – $50,000
    www.nrdc.org
    Supports NRDC’s Global Mercury Campaign and its on-going efforts to advise on and strengthen the implementation of the international treaty to control mercury pollution, the Minamata Convention.

2019


Collaborative Networks Program 

2019

RE-AMP Network

2019

  • RE-AMP Network, fiscal sponsor The Minneapolis Foundation (Minneapolis, MN) – $450,000
    www.reamp.org
    An eight state (Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin) collaborative network advancing equitable deep decarbonization solutions to mitigate climate change.  Supports general operations and re-granting programs.

Cancer Free Economy Network

2019

  • Clean Production Action, (Somerville, MA) – $160,000
    www.cleanproduction.org
    Supports CFEN’s Market Shift Node to transform markets by identifying safer alternatives to cancer-causing chemicals and mobilizing community activists and workers through trainings. 
  • Children’s Environmental Health Network (Washington, D.C.) – $160,000
    www.cehn.org
    Supports the Health and Science Node of the Cancer Free Economy Network to continue and expand its three priority projects (science for the Network; engaging health and cancer-focused leaders and organizations on environmental links to cancer; and advancing a prevention-focused research agenda), and for cross-nodal/network-wide collaboration. 
  • The Labor Institute (New York, NY) – $160,000
    www.thelaborinstitute.org
    Supports CFEN’s Building Power Node to engage diverse communities including labor, front line communities and environmental justice advocates in the work of CFEN and to host training workshops on CFEN’s Chemicals, Cancer, Chronic Disease and the Economy curriculum.
  • Center for Environmental Health (Oakland, CA) – $140,000
    www.ceh.org
    Supports the Policy & Legal Hub of the Cancer Free Economy Network in carrying out strategic technical assistance efforts that engage with and advance the goals for the CFEN Nodes and generate policy and legal initiatives that directly serve the Network in reaching its goal of protecting people from harmful cancer-causing chemicals.
  • Clean Production Action, (Somerville, MA) – $452,692
    www.cleanproduction.org
    Supports the Cancer Free Economy Network operations, member collaborations, convenings, communications, and staff including CFEN’s Strategic Director and coordinators for the Market Shift Node and Communications Hub. It also seeds CFEN’s re-granting function through its Emergent Opportunities Fund.
  • Children’s Environmental Health Network (Washington, D.C.) – $42,436
    www.cehn.org
    Supports the CFEN Health Science (HS) Node Coordinator to maintain the effective implementation of the HS Node’s activities and facilitate information flow to/from and among all of CFEN’s teams (nodes, hubs, working groups etc).
  • The Labor Institute (New York, NY) – $42,436
    www.thelaborinstitute.org
    Supports the CFEN Building Power (BP) Node Coordinator to maintain the effective implementation of the BP Node’s activities and facilitate information flow to/from and among all of CFEN’s teams.
  • Center for Environmental Health (Oakland, CA) – $42,436
    www.ceh.org
    Supports the CFEN Policy Legal (PL) Hub Coordinator to maintain the effective implementation of the PL Hub’s activities and facilitate information flow to/from and among all of CFEN’s teams.

Network Support

2019

  • Energy Action Network (Montpelier, VT) – $60,000
    www.eanvt.org
    Supports EAN to transition its network structure from a traditional “backbone” organization to a more distributed network that: creates greater buy-in for shared work; builds the capacity of Network members and their organizations and supports greater progress on strategic interventions in EAN’s systems analysis.
  • The Wallace Center at Winrock International (Little Rock, AR) – $75,000
    www.wallacecenter.org
    Supports the strategic growth, systems orientation and evolution of the Food Systems Leadership Network (FSLN), a national peer learning community working to realize a just, equitable, and sustainable food system that generates good food, health, and opportunity for all.
  • Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance, fiscal sponsor Urban Sustainability Directors Network (Port Washington, WI) – $75,000
    www.carbonneutralcities.org
    Supports integrating a systemic lens into CNCA’s 2020-2022 strategic planning process and Game Changer working groups, and the co-hosting of a Transformational Leadership training at the 2019 USDN Annual Meeting.
  • Midwest Environmental Justice Network (MWEJN), fiscal sponsor Center for Earth, Energy and Democracy (Minneapolis, MN) – $60,000
    www.ceed.org
    Supports the MWEJN to develop its network structure and to build its members’ collaborative capacity. The MWEJN works to ensure that environmental justice groups in the Midwest have the resources and capacity to effectively organize its members to address environmental justice issues and to participate in local, state, regional and federal policy development.
  • Network for Energy, Water and Health in Affordable Buildings (NEWHAB), fiscal sponsor Energy Foundation (San Francisco, CA) – $55,000
    www.newhab.net
    Supports NEWHAB to apply a systems framework to its strategic planning process and to experiment with tools and processes that will help move the new vision forward.

Advancing Systems Change Practices

2019

  • Institute for Strategic Clarity – $75,000
    www.instituteforstrategicclarity.org
    Supports development and prototyping of online learning modules that teach advanced topics in systems mapping, analysis and assessment for practitioners in communities, non-profits and foundations.
  • The Forbes Funds – $50,000
    www.forbesfunds.org
    Supports an initiative to advance Pittsburgh as a global “Liminal City,” aligned with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. The initiative is in partnership with the Bateson Institute, using their Warm Data Labs methodology to develop the capacity of nonprofit leaders in systems-informed, multi-stakeholder engagement.  
  • Academy for Systems Change – $50,000
    www.academyforchange.org
    Supports a convening of systems-change and network consultants for the purpose of building a stronger community of providers equipped to lead systems change efforts, support emerging networks, and facilitate learning programs for social change and sustainability leaders.
  • Forum for the Future (Brooklyn, NY) – $150,000
    www.forumforthefuture.org
    Supports Forum for the Future’s School of System Change to build system change capabilities and practices of change-makers and to implement a governance and partnership structure that enable the School to effectively scale its learning offers.
  • McConnell Foundation (Montreal, QC) – $55,000
    www.mcconnellfoundation.org
    Supports identifying and organizing systems change resources (written materials, online courses, programs, workshops, fellowships, learning communities, etc.), to provide a comprehensive and accessible collection about and for systems change and collaborative network practitioners.
  • University of Colorado Boulder, fiscal sponsor University of Colorado Foundation, (Boulder, CO) – $40,000
    www.colorado.edu
    Supports systems change curriculum developers and educators to co-design syllabi and develop core content for a variety of systems thinking capacity building programs including undergraduate, graduate and early to mid-career development programs.
  • Health and Environmental Funders Network (HEFN), fiscal sponsor Virginia Organizing Inc (Charlottesville, VA) $100,000
    www.hefn.org
    Supports a collaborative major donor outreach initiative with the intent to secure greater investment to reduce toxic chemicals that cause cancer and other diseases.

Environmental Sustainability Program

2019

Los Angeles Sustainability

2019

  • Water Foundation (Sacramento, CA) – $150,000
    www.waterfdn.org
    Supports the development of an inclusive and diverse Water, Health, and Equity Network in Los Angeles.
  • TreePeople (Beverly Hills, CA) – $50,000
    www.treepeople.org
    Supports engaging municipal agencies in developing a pilot implementation plan for a public/private partnership for widespread residential rainwater harvesting in Los Angeles County.
  • Nature for All, fiscal sponsor Community Partners (Los Angeles, CA) – $40,000
    www.lanatureforall.org
    Supports Nature for All’s Water Resilient LA program, participation in the OurWaterLA coalition and an emergent network focused on water, health and equity.
  • Pacoima Beautiful (Pacoima, CA) – $25,000
    www.pacoimabeautiful.org
    Supports Pacoima Beautiful’s Agua University, a five week summer program for young students of color from Northeast San Fernando Valley, participation in the OurWaterLA coalition, and an emergent network focused on water, health and equity..
  • Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy (Los Angeles, CA) – $35,000
    www.laane.org
    Supports LAANE’s Water Infrastructure Equity and Jobs: Creating Careers in the Green Economy project, with a particular focus on ensuring that new jobs created through stormwater project development are quality, permanent jobs that provide stability and the chance for economic mobility, especially for Angelenos from disadvantaged communities.

Mercury Source Reduction

2019

  • Consumers for Dental Choice (Washington, D.C.) – $44,000
    www.toxicteeth.org 
    Supports CDC’s Campaign for Mercury-Free Dentistry, the World Alliance for Mercury Free Dentistry, and WAMFD’s effort to advise countries as they implement the reduction of dental mercury as dictated in the international treaty to control mercury pollution, the Minamata Convention.
  • Mercury Policy Project (Montpelier, VT) – $75,000
    www.mercurypolicy.org
    Supports MPP’s Zero Mercury Campaign, its engagement in the Zero Mercury Working Group, and its on-going efforts to advise on and strengthen the implementation of the international treaty to control mercury pollution, the Minamata Convention.
  • Natural Resources Defense Council (Washington, D.C.) – $75,000
    www.nrdc.org
    Supports NRDC’s Global Mercury Campaign and its on-going efforts to advise on and strengthen the implementation of the international treaty to control mercury pollution, the Minamata Convention.

Mollie SpeiglmanGrants